X

On Gray cities

It’s a well-known fact that our countryside’s population ages. However, the number of elderly in our cities grows much faster, both in absolute number as in relative growth. Amsterdam for instance, will see 200,000 new senior citizens in the next thirty years. A 212 percent increase compared to 2010. Guest editor Tijs van den Boomen explores the implications of the aging of the city in this special edition of S+RO Magazine. According to the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) aging offers “a new perspective for the housing, mobility and the regional economy, and for the support of existing retail, leisure... Read More

It’s a well-known fact that our countryside’s population ages. However, the number of elderly in our cities grows much faster, both in absolute number as in relative growth. Amsterdam for instance, will see 200,000 new senior citizens in the next thirty years. A 212 percent increase compared to 2010. Guest editor Tijs van den Boomen explores the implications of the aging of the city in this special edition of S+RO Magazine.

According to the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) aging offers “a new perspective for the housing, mobility and the regional economy, and for the support of existing retail, leisure and care.” (link) PBL elucidate the situation at national level, but it remains unclear how this gray city looks and what the “new perspective” means at a local level. What does the gray city actually look like at the neighborhood level? The Cloud Collective went to investigate and ended up in Vlaardingen, a city with three neighborhoods in the top 25. The city is desperately trying to attract young people. But one can wonder why: An aging population itself offers plenty of possibilities.

Read the article (in Dutch) here.

FACTS
Program: Article

Client: S+RO Magazine
Year: 2014

^